FanPost

Georgia Bulldogs 2020 NFL Draft Scouting Report


#98 Rodrigo Blankenship (rSr.) PK 6-1 191. Has appeared in 42 games. Graduated in December of 2018. Has en extremely strong leg! Is excellent at having his kickoffs go thru the back of the end zone for touchbacks (96 kickoffs with 82 touchbacks for an 85.42% rate). Kickoffs go thru the back of the end zone regularly. Has good fundamentals as a field goal kicker. Has a quick and easy kicking motion. Isn’t automatic on place kicks but has improved each season. Should get drafted but if not will be a highly sought after priority UDFA. 6th-UDFA.

#18 Lawrence Cager (rSr.) WR 6-5 220. Has appeared in 34 games with 18 starts. Graduate transfer from Miami. Versatile. Has experience lined up primarily at the Z but has played in the X and Y positions as well. Has excellent size for the position. Has great height and an incredible wingspan. Has an impressive catch radius. Good athlete. Has really good jumping ability. Has really quick feet. Has a fast stutter step out of his stance at the LOS and into his route.

Missed the 2016 season after suffering a torn right ACL in July of that year. Wasn’t fully recovered for all of the 2017 season as a result. Doesn’t possess great athleticism. Doesn’t have really good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.60-4.65 40 range). Lacks good lateral agility. Inconsistent route runner. Runs sloppy routes at times. Appears cable of only running downfield routes like 7’s, 8’s and 9 routes (corner, post and go routes respectively). Doesn’t have great hands. Will drop some very catchable passes. Isn’t a very good blocker. Lacks the lower body strength to be a strong run blocker and he doesn’t break down in space well.

His excellent size and red zone ability are very intriguing but he is a player who’s career has to this point been marred by injury and inconsistency. He’s still extremely raw and unrefined in the areas such as route running and blocking. His route running issues can improve some but he’ll never be a great one due to his length as lack of physical fluidity. He can’t sink his hips without compromising the little bit of speed he does have. He’s a specialized type player or red zone player only with no ST capability. He will be given opportunities to show that he is a player at every turn but won’t show so well in a Combine or Pro Day type setting. Isn’t productive enough to get drafted but should definitely be a priority post draft. UDFA.

#30 Tae Crowder (rSr.) ILB 6-3 235. Has appeared in 30 games with 5 starts. Really good athlete. A fluid mover. Has natural movement skills and no stiffness. Covers a good amount of ground in and out of his backpedal. Has sideline to sideline speed (appears to run in the 4.55-4.65 40 range). Has a high motor. Chases plays down (vs. Auburn 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:35 mark). Has good instincts. Doesn’t make any missteps. Has some stoutness to his game. Really productive in the tackle box. Has good ball awareness (vs. Florida 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:11 mark). Reads the QB’s eyes well. Takes away some passing lanes to the flats and over the middle in the intermediate level by reading QB’s.

Still relatively inexperienced. Moved from RB to ILB in October of 2016. Doesn’t have much career production (60 tackles, 6 tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks and 2 INT’s). Doesn’t take on and absorb blockers well. Isn’t adept at slipping blocks. Doesn’t plant, stack and shed blocks. Always moving when OL approach. Gets moved off of the ball and stuck to blocks at times. Tends to overrun plays some. Will over pursue and get blocked out of a play on the ball.

He’s acclimated himself very well to the LB position. His athleticism shows and his offensive background has translated to his understanding of what a defender should do. He does have a broad view of things because of that he is a bit advanced in his adjustment to the defensive side of the ball. Along with that though he does have limited snaps having only played 378 defensive snaps in 2018. In his 203 against the run he showed good instincts but would still over pursue because he tries to avoid blocks as opposed to taking them head on. His missed out on a few too many tackles because he put himself out of position to do so. He seemed more equipped in his 175 plays against the pass. His ability to read a QB and cover ground to the flats and in the intermediate level was really good. He has the ability to be a really good LB on passing downs if he gains a lot more experience there. He’s a player who would have been best served if he made the transition to LB sooner and got a lot more reps but he does have next level upside despite it. He could be a prospect who doesn’t reach his full potential until he’s on the next level. Will share snaps once again but should get more than he did a season ago. 6th-UDFA.

#20 J. R. Reed (rSr.) SS/FS 6-1 194. Has appeared in 42 games with 29 starts. Transferred from Tulsa to Georgia in August of 2016. Has NFL bloodlines. Father Jake Reed was a 3rd round pick by the Minnesota Vikings in the 1991 NFL Draft and had a 12 year career. Uncle Dale Carter was a 1st round pick by the Kansas City Chiefs in the 1992 NFL Draft and had a 12 year career. Graduated in December of 2018. Versatile. Has experience at both the field and boundary S positions. Good athlete. Has really good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.45-4.55 40 range). Has good fluidity and agility. Doesn’t have any stiffness in his movements. Has good range from one hash mark to the other (vs. Alabama 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 6:55 mark). Closes fast downhill in the running game. Solid tackler. Good wrap up tackler. Breaks down well in the open field.

Overaged. Will be a 25 year old rookie (born March 11, 1995). Isn’t always instinctive in coverage (vs. Missouri 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 5 at the 10:41 mark). Doesn’t recognize mismatches in coverage (vs. Tennessee 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 12 at the 5:23 mark). Doesn’t backpedal and flip his hip seamlessly (vs. Florida 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 13:44 mark). Gets outmuscled by TE’s and FB’s close to the LOS. Doesn’t disengage from blocks quickly.

He’s a solid overall player who can play both FS and SS. He’s a good player who isn’t prone to mistakes, just good play. Although solid he hasn’t displayed any special skills. He isn’t a ball hawking rangy player who will make a great INT or get over the top to save his CB from getting beaten. He doesn’t provide special play as a SS who can come down in the box and contend with OL, TE’s and FB’s. He lacks the size and strength for that type of play. His interchangeable abilities are his calling card but his age will be a factor in a lot of minds. It shouldn’t matter but it will because he is just good. He’s a definite next level prospect for sure but his stock won’t be as high as it should be going into the Draft. He should perform really well at the Combine if invited because he’s a well rounded athlete. 5th-7th round.

#80 Eli Wolf (rSr.) TE 6-4 236. Has appeared in 27 games with 8 starts. Graduate transfer from Tennessee. Former walk on who earned a scholarship in the fall of 2017. Versatile. Has lined up in the H-Back role (in-line at TE, detached at TE, outside at receiver, in the slot and at FB). Decent athlete. A natural hands catcher. Has good blocking technique. Can get out in space and latch on to a DB at times. A good cut blocker from the FB position (vs. South Carolina 2018, 1st & 10 at the 4:32 mark).

Has very little career production (9 catches, 86 yards and 1 TD). Doesn’t have great size for the position. Appears on the slender side. Doesn’t have much mass on his frame. Has thin arms a slim waist, a small trunk with thin thighs and calves. Built more like a WR. Isn’t a great athlete. Doesn’t have a lot of straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.75-4.85 40 range). Lacks any burst off of the snap. Isn’t a sharp route runner. Very deliberate in all of his movements. Rounds off his routes. Slow out of his breaks. Can’t create separation in his routes. Isn’t a strong run blocker. Can’t sustain blocks for the most part.

He’s a well seasoned veteran of the collegiate game so he should make the adjustment pretty quickly and make an instant contribution to his new team. He’s not a top quality TE so his pass catches will be limited. His versatility will be welcomed but he isn’t a threat to steal playing time and excel. He will be useful but not to the point where he garners a lot of next level notice as a viable next level prospect. He has to perform well enough during the season and again at his Pro Day workout. If he can show enough speed and agility he may get some looks post draft. UDFA.

#52 Tyler Clark (Sr.) DE 6-4 300. Has appeared in 41 games with 22 starts. Has excellent size for the position. Has broad shoulders with really long arms. Has good weight distribution from head to toe. Versatile. Has experience at DE in a 3-4, NT and at DT in a 4-3. Decent athlete. Has a relentless streak. A slasher. Cuts thru the OL like a knife at times. Can make himself skinny thru a crease. Gets good penetration when he does. Ha ms a good club rip move as a pass rusher. Has quick hands when using this move. Shows good quickness off of the snap. Gets from A to B fast at times (vs. Alabama 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 5 at the 9:20 mark). Has good play recognition (vs. Auburn 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 16 at the 13:33 mark).

Doesn’t offer much as a pass rusher. Has no moves when attempting to get to the QB. Lacks creativity as a pass rusher. Has an inconsistent get off at the snap. Lacks speed and agility on stunts. Has narrow and tight hips. Doesn’t have good bend around OL. Isn’t always stout. Doesn’t always have a good pad level off of the snap. Stands straight up out of his stance. Allows OL under his pads too often. Gets controlled and knocked back off of the LOS. Ineffective when double teamed. Gets totally taken out of plays when multiple OL focus in on him. Doesn’t have good hand usage. Gets stuck to blocks more often than not.

He has some of the components you look for in a DL. He certainly has the size and he shows some of the strength and flashes quickness at the snap but it all doesn’t fully come together. He’s inconsistent in all facets of play. That same size and length get negated when he rises up out of his stance which also takes away any leverage he may have had as a run defender. His physical limitations take away from his ability as a pass rusher. He does have next level capabilities but he’s more of a rotational player than he is a starter. He can be looked upon for solid depth but he has to correct his pad level issues and not firing off of the ball consistently in order for him to stick long term. If he gets an invite to the Combine he may test well in the short shuttle but not much else. He doesn’t have that flexibility you want in a DL who isn’t a pass rusher and isn’t an elite type run defender. 6th-UDFA.

#74 Ben Cleveland (rJr.) RG/RT 6-6 335. Has appeared in 23 games with 9 starts. Versatile. Has experience as a starter at RG and in game experience at RT as well. A monstrous and imposing human being! Really tall with broad shoulders and long arms. Great weight distribution all throughout his frame. Built like an OT. An absolute powerhouse! Workout warrior! Reportedly bench pressed 225 pounds 50 times in August of 2017! Was stopped by the strength coach after the 50th rep. Did 5 reps of 160 pounds on an incline with one arm with little effort. Power cleaned 405 pounds on March 6, 2019. Good athlete. Is really coordinated in all of his movements. Has a composed and steady kick slide at RT. Doesn’t get knocked back by defenders on initial contact. Has a very strong hand punch. Jostles defenders back upon contact. Consistently keeps his pad level down. Doesn’t rise up out of his stance. Gets to the second level easily. Latches on without lunging. Keeps his head on a swivel. Keeps his head up and will come off of one block to stop a blitzer and make a fumble recovery (vs. Middle Tennessee State 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 14 at the 8:20 mark). Moves the pile with a strong push in short yardage situations.

Only played 208 total offensive snaps during the 2018 season. Suffered a fractured left fibula against Missouri on September 22, 2018. The injury didn’t require surgery. Missed the following five games before returning against Auburn on November 10, 2018. Suffered a sprained ankle after only two snaps against Auburn and wasn’t quite 100% for the rest of the season. Feet remain stationary after the snap in pass protection at times. Attempts to bench press them flat footed. Doesn’t consistently show good hand placement. Defenders tend to slide out of his clutches. Has a bit of lateral stiffness. Doesn’t transfer his weight from one direction to the other quickly.

He’s a big, strong, coordinated and good athlete for someone his size but he isn’t a great one. His feet aren’t slow but he’s no dancing bear especially at RT either. His mobility is lesser because he’s such a specimen. This limits his versatility some at RT although he can play there for spells at a time. He’s not an outside lineman so his best position should be at RG. He has to improve his foot speed there as well but it’s less of a concern. He needs to improve his foot activity in general which can get lazy at times. He can outmuscle most anyone by bench pressing them but he didn’t play many DL who could beat him with speed in 2018. He has to show that he’s not just powerful but a player who can make adjustments with some agility and mobility. He did good against the first four teams he played against by allowing zero pressures in 100 snaps as a pass blocker but there wasn’t much great competition to speak of in the trenches. He would most certainly be the talk of the town at the Combine with his performance in the strength drills but struggle some in the ones he has to move. He has next level strength for sure but needs more time honing his overall technique with his hands placement and foot speed. Doesn’t declare.

#35 Brian Herrien (Sr.) RB 6-0 210. Has appeared in 40 games with 0 starts. Has good size for the position. Good athlete. Has good short area quickness (vs. Tennessee 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 1 at the 5:02 mark). Has good balance. Stays centered. Has some wiggle to him thru the hole. Isn’t easily knocked off of his pins. Keeps his legs churning after contact. Fights tooth and nail for an extra yard. Falls forward after contact for the most part. Has good power to run thru defenders at times (vs. Texas 2019, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 13:18 mark). Has good hands out of the backfield.

Doesn’t have a great deal of career production (174 carries, 923 yards and 7 TD’s with 12 catches, 57 yards and 1 TD). Only played 133 offensive snaps in 2018. Hasn’t had a 10+ carry game since October 1, 2016. Isn’t a particularly great athlete. Doesn’t have any really good physical trait. Doesn’t have great speed. Isn’t a breakaway threat. Can’t get to the perimeter and beat defenders to the outside. Runs a bit tall. Pad level is too high as he approaches the LOS. Doesn’t always secure the ball thru the hole. Carries the ball with one arm and doesn’t alway cover up with the other on contact. An inexperienced and unrefined route runner. Isn’t a sharp route runner out of the backfield. Runs simple flat, flare and seam routes.

He’s an athlete who won’t wow anyone, but more than likely surprise them with how quick and agile he is. He’s a tough, hard charging back. It seems as if most of his carries end with the refs blowing the whistle after his forward progress has been stopped but defenders couldn’t bring him down to the ground. He should be used as a short yardage specialist because that’s what he’s equipped to do. Since he’s been a backup his whole career and will continue to be in a time share with backs more physically talented than he is, he won’t gain much traction as a next level prospect. He will be a solid surprise to the team that picks him up after the draft because he does have skills that weren’t utilized to the fullest because he was behind great backs. He has a great deal of tread left on his tires because he was so underutilized. He’s a quality RB. He may not be a Combine invite more than likely so his Pro Day workout will be very important. He should show that he doesn’t have great speed but that he’s more than tough and athletic enough. UDFA.

#66 Solomon Kindley (rJr.) LG/RG 6-4 335. Has appeared in 30 games with 21 starts (14 at LG and 7 at RG). Versatile. Has starting experience at both LG and RG. Played a total of 785 offensive snaps in 2018. Has excellent size for the OG position. Has wide shoulders and a very thick frame from top to bottom. Good athlete. Really quick and agile. Has fast and fluid feet. Shows quickness off of the line. Has really good movement skills in space. He can get out to the second and at times third levels as a run blocker. Latches on at a high rate at the second level. Gets out there, collects himself and his footwork and can latch on (vs. South Carolina 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 22 at the 7:00 mark and vs. LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the :35 mark). Drives his feet and powers thru defenders (vs. Alabama 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 9:48 mark). Keeps a wide base. Constantly readjusts his hands to control a defender. Very aware of his surroundings. Keeps his head on a swivel.

Was carted off the field in the 1st quarter against Vanderbilt on October 6, 2018. He was diagnosed with a mild MCL sprain to the right knee and ruled out for the remainder of the game. Doesn’t consistently stay low out of his stance in pass protection. Allows defenders under his pads at times. Upper body gets bent backwards. Gets pushed back into the pocket in these instances. Will get caught flat footed at times. Doesn’t always take good angles as a pass blocker. Gives up pressure because his body was in the wrong position. Doesn’t consistently display great hand placement. Blocks don’t always stick. Defenders tend to slide out of his clutches. Doesn’t do much pulling.

He’s a big, quick and nimble OL. He’s really light on his feet which benefits him greatly. He can set up quickly and be set for a DL as either a pass or run blocker. When he gets out to the second level he’s in position to block without lunging or whiffing. He can quiet DL and at times overpower them as well. He does have to work on his hand placement so that when he gets his hands on a defender he has complete control instead of them slipping out. His angling as a pass blocker could improve as well. He’s often there but his feet and body position allow for the defender to get to the QB. He’s strong but doesn’t impose his will enough. If he can get a bit stronger he will be a top next level prospect for his position and rise up draft boards after a stellar offseason with a great showing at the Combine and his interviews with teams. He has the makings of a player who could be the total package and a Pro Bowl performer for years. He has to sure up some issues and he’s on his way. 2nd-3rd round.

#51 David Marshall (Sr.) DE 6-3 274. Has appeared in 32 games with 7 starts. Decent athlete. Really quick in a phone booth. Has quick hands. Pushes and slaps OL hands down and gets them off balance. Successfully gets past OL in this manner consistently. Keeps his pad level down off of the snap. Gives the OL a good pop on initial contact. Has a strong hand punch. Stout. Doesn’t give ground as a run defender.

Suffered a lisfranc fracture to his left foot against Vanderbilt on October 6, 2018. Had season ending surgery as a result of the injury. Very limited during spring practices. Doesn’t have much career production (58 tackles, 7 tackles for loss and 3.5 sacks). Lacks ideal size. Has tweener size for the position. Appears nearly maxed out in the size department. Isn’t a great athlete. Doesn’t have good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.90-5.00 40 range). Doesn’t have good jumping ability. Shows a good deal of hip stiffness. Doesn’t show good change of direction capability. Can’t bend around the outside shoulder of an OT as a pass rusher.

His short area quickness, hand punch and hand quickness are on the impressive side. He gets results based off of these three factors. He’s a valuable collegiate player but he doesn’t have much next level potential. He isn’t a starter on this team. He’s more of a rotational DE in a 3-4 who is limited with what he can do because he isn’t very athletic and isn’t a pass rusher. He can get to the QB on occasion but he’s far from the player who can threaten and collapse the pocket and wreck havoc down to down. He’s more of a two down player but there aren’t any undersized run defenders who offer very little in the pass rush department. He won’t help himself as far as next level evaluators with the fact that he won’t test well in agility drills at his Pro Day workout. UDFA.

#26 Tyrique McGhee (Sr.) NCB/Star 5-10 187. Has appeared in 41 games with 9 starts. Versatile. Plays in the slot, close to the LOS at LB depth and over the TE. Good athlete. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.50-4.55 40 range). A quick twitch athlete. Has really good movement skills. Really agile. Has fluid hips. Can turn and run seamlessly. Has quick feet in his backpedal. Springs out of it and back towards the ball.

Suffered a small stress fracture in the fifth metatarsal in his right/left foot on August 11, 2018 during fall practice. Missed the first game on September 1, 2018 as a result. Doesn’t have a great deal of career production (57 tackles, 10 passes defensed, 2 INT’s, 1 tackle for loss and .5 sacks). Is an undersized player. Lacks ideal size. He’s short, has small bone structure with a narrow waist with thin thighs and calves. Isn’t very strong. Gets blocked out of plays easily by TE’s and is handled by WR’s as a run defender. Isn’t a strong tackler. Doesn’t have the strength to bring a ball carrier or receiver down without giving up forward progress. Misses a good amount of tackles. Has some tackle attempts broken. Only really plays receivers to the short routes. Mostly plays inside leverage. Susceptible to any of the upfield routes (vs. Florida 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:11 mark) and (vs. Kentucky 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 2:35 mark). Doesn’t have great recovery speed. Can’t turn and run with a receiver who has gained an advantage on him. Doesn’t disguise his blitzes very well. Tips his hand presnap.

He’s a good athlete but he lacks a specific or special trait that would make him a viable next level prospect. His lack of size and strength are obvious on every play. He isn’t an in the trenches player which is a role he’s often tasked with as a slot defender. He can’t disengage from blocks if he isn’t being blocked and run way out of the play or outright pancaked. He doesn’t penetrate the LOS as a blitzer if he’s blocked at all. He knows the defense well and is a valuable member of it but he may not be able to hold off the bigger and more talented players who backed him up last year. UDFA.

#16 Demetris Robertson (rJr.) WR 6-0 190. Has appeared in 23 games with 13 starts. Transferred from Cal to Georgia in July of 2018 and was granted immediate eligibility. Versatile. Has experience on the outside and inside at slot receiver. Extremely athletic! Reportedly ran a 4.35 40 in the spring of 2018 post surgery. Goes from 0 to 60 swiftly. Has good short area quickness. Has good hand eye coordination. Has excellent concentration. Tracks the ball really well over his shoulder. (vs. Stanford 2016, 4th quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 3:39 mark). Can make a catch and get his foot/feet down in the end zone (vs. Arizona State 2016, 1st quarter, 2nd & 6 at the 10:05 mark), (vs. Arizona State 2016, 4th quarter, 2nd & 10 at the :59 mark) and (vs. Oregon 2016, 1st quarter, 3rd & Goal at the 4:35 mark). Has solid hands. A natural hands catcher.

Had season ending surgery in September of 2017 on a nagging lower body injury after two games for Cal. Suffered a concussion against LSU on October 13, 2018 and missed the following three games. Hasn’t been productive at all over a two year span. Played only 89 offensive snaps in 2018. Had a minimal amount of production in 2018 (Only 3 passes thrown in his direction with 0 catches and 1 drop. Had 4 rushing attempts with 1 TD). Appears smaller than his listed height and weight of 6-0 190. Appears skinny with little muscular development. Has small bone structure with A narrow waist and skinny thighs and calves. Isn’t a refined route runner. Doesn’t run a sharp route. Rounds off his routes. Arm tends to flail out in the opposite direction of his breaks (vs. USC 2016, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 15:00 mark). Has bad footwork as a route runner. Doesn’t have the frame to add much size. Lacks the size and strength to sustain a block. Will drop some easy passes.

He’s an amazing natural talent. He was born with great natural gifts. His speed is exceptional to go along with his overall athleticism. He’s not only blazing fast but he’s quick as well. He has a good pair of hands to go along with those natural abilities as well. He seems to specialize in making great contested catches. His ability to catch passes over his shoulder is both a skill and a talent that he possesses. Of course all of his production dates back to 2016 as a freshman at Cal though. With his injury shortened 2017 and unproductive 2018 he only has 7 catches for 70 yards and 0 TD’s since the 2016 season. There were factors that contributed to his 2018 season being what it was and firstly it was his really late arrival on campus for the 2018 season. He was way behind in the learning and mental aspects of the playbook and never caught up. Along with the concussion he was a non factor. He’s a much better player than he showed in 2018 and should show that he’s a top level talent. His game needs a lot of work and lots of refinement though in order for him to become a viable next level prospect who doesn’t have to exhaust his eligibility. He could stand to use these two seasons to hone his skill set but he may leave after a solid to really good year. His route running, size are injury history will be question marks moving forward. His size limits his next level upside because he has slot receiver size only. 5th-7th round.

#5 Julian Rochester (Sr.) NT/DT 6-5 300. Has appeared in 42 games with 19 starts. Versatile. Has experience at NT and DE in a 3-4 and at DT in a 4-3 front. Big and strong. Has excellent size for the position. Has broad shoulders with long arms. Decent athlete. Has decent straight line speed for a big DL (appears to run in the 5.15-5.25 40 range). Has a good motor. Will chase a play down the field.

Was arrested on April 12, 2016 on two felony charges which were the possession of a BB gun in a school zone and second degree criminal damage to a dorm. Isn’t a good athlete. Has a stiff lower half. He also is on the plodding side in his lower body movements. Has a really inconsistent pad level. Tends to rise up and then out off of the snap. A bit slow off of the snap. Lacks pass rush ability. Doesn’t display any burst as a pass rusher. Doesn’t get close to the QB as a DE when going around the OT’s outside shoulder. Doesn’t use his hands well. Has really inactive hands usage. Doesn’t disengage from blocks quickly. Gets stuck far too often. Stays occupied (vs. Florida 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:11 mark). Gets walled and sealed off as a run defender.

He’s strong but he’s not a next level anchor. He’s too tall and has too stiff a lower body to ready ever consistently get low enough. He can’t get under an OL’s pads and gain leverage as much as he’d need to. He isn’t much of a next level prospect at DE in a 3-4 either because he lacks and pass rush ability or once again the ability to hold the fort down at the point of attack. When he makes a tackle it isn’t behind or at the LOS but around four yards past the line. He isn’t an interior enforcer and may have his snaps cut into because the talent that’s behind him. He’s not good enough to hold off the competition on the depth chart so he may not make much noise as a next level prospect at all. He won’t test well in the agility drills at his Pro Day workout. UDFA.

#89 Charlie Woerner (Sr.) TE 6-5 245. Has appeared in 40 games with 5 starts. Has football bloodlines. Uncle Scott Woerner played for the University of Georgia from 19-1981. He’s a College Football Hall of Famer. Was the 80th pick in the 3rd round by the Atlanta Falcons in the 1981 NFL Draft. Versatile. Has experience lined up inline, in the slot as a TE, out wide at receiver as well as in the backfield in an H-Back type role. Decent athlete. Has decent straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.80-4.85 40 range). Gets a good release off of the LOS when lined up inline. Quick out of his stance. Has good agility after the catch (vs. Florida 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 11:50 mark). Has good blocking technique. Stays centered and squared up towards his target. Gets his weight behind him. Has good hand placement. Latches on very well in space.

Doesn’t have much career production (25 catches for 298 yards and 0 TD’s). Has been used primarily as a blocker. Isn’t a great athlete. Has a bit of hip stiffness. Has to almost stop and collect himself and readjust to change direction. Isn’t a polished route runner. Routes are run in a very deliberate manner. Rounds off his routes. Is a tick slow into and out of his breaks. Isn’t a yards after the catch pass catcher. Doesn’t create separation in his own.

To his credit he has been tasked with playing a big mans game and he’s done a good job. He’s adept to blocking players at all three levels but especially DL and LB’s. His technique is good against the DL and he breaks down especially well against the second and third level players. He’s a limited athlete though with what he can do as a next level prospect. He’s neither quick or fast and he’s not a powerful blocker either. He’s good but not a standout type blocker. He could benefit from adding about 15 pounds to his frame because he’s a lean looking player at his current weight. With the added mass he could be a much better blocker and he really wouldn’t lose anything athletically either. With his shortcomings in the athletic department he’s still a really like able prospect. He could catch on as a ST player and back up TE in the right system but he’s not for everyone. UDFA.

#95 Devonte Wyatt (Sr.) NT/DT 6-3 301. Has appeared in 12 games with 0 starts. JC transfer. Versatile. Has experience at both NT and DE in a 3-4 front and DT in their 4-3 front. Good athlete. Has good speed and quickness for a DL. Has good mobility and agility. Quick off of the snap at times. Very active. Has a nonstop motor. Always moving. Will chase a play down the field (vs. Texas 2019, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 5 at the 12:06 mark). Closes really fast on stunts as a pass rusher (vs. Texas 2019, 4th quarter, 3rd & 4 at the 8:19 mark).

Suffered an undisclosed leg injury during a practice leading up to the Vanderbilt game on October 6, 2018. Missed that game and the following weeks game against LSU. Doesn’t have a great deal of career production at this stage (19 tackles, 1.5 tackles for loss and 1.5 sacks). A bit raw in his technique. Isn’t consistently quick or fast at the snap. Generally is the third out of the three defenders moving forward towards the OL. Tends to rise straight up out of his stance and then forward. Does a lot of swatting with his hands as opposed to using an particular technique. Doesn’t always show scheme discipline. Will scratch and claw to penetrate the line instead of staying home. Vacates his gap responsibilities. Creates running lanes to run thru at times.

He does some things as a DL that you love to see. He refuses to stay blocked if he can help it. He really hustles and shows good speed when chasing plays. He understands angles and how to cut ball carriers off downfield like a defensive back. He’s at his most effective when his first move is forward and low towards the OL. He’s quick enough to be disruptive but is often undone by his lack of technique. He needs a lot of technique refinement in order for him to become a real viable next level prospect. He needs to consistently move forward and stay low out of his stance. When he goes up against OL who have solid technique themselves he tends to get stopped dead in his tracks (vs. Alabama 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:28 mark). He has a ways to go in his overall development as a player and can’t be considered much more than a developmental prospect. He’ll test well in a Combine setting if invited and at his Pro Day. 7th-UDFA.

#11 Jake Fromm (Jr.) QB 6-2 220. Has appeared in 29 games with 28 starts. A cerebral QB. A football junkie. Loves to learn as much about the position of QB as possible. A very quick learner. Decent athlete. Has decent straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.75-4.85 40 range). Has experience in a pro style offense. Equally adept under center as he is in the shotgun. Has textbook footwork when he sets up as a drop back passer. Has smooth feet in his 3, 5 and 7 step drops when under center. Has a strong arm. Has a compact and really quick release. Can make every throw in the book. Passes thrown on a line seem to pick up steam as they travel. Very accurate to the short and intermediate levels. Puts his receivers in a position to succeed on almost every completion. Throws nearly perfect passes to his check downs. Uses his RB’s in the passing game a lot. Accurate play action passer (vs. Missouri 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:40 mark). Changes his arm angle with accuracy easily (vs. Kentucky 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the :35 mark). Has good accuracy and arm strength on out routes across the harsh mark (vs. Tennessee 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 8 at the 4:02 mark). Can loft a very accurate pass over a defender (vs. Alabama 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:34 mark, again in a very tight window vs. Alabama 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 3:16 mark and vs. Alabama 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 12:47 mark). Goes thru his progressions (vs. Alabama 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 9 at the 4:40 mark). Throws an accurate back shoulder pass (vs. Missouri 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 5 at the 7:11 mark). Adjusts his footwork in a calm and composed manner when going thru his progressions. Can hit on a deep pass with accuracy at times (vs. Vanderbilt 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:30 mark). Has really good pocket awareness. Has a feel for the pressure. Protects the ball as he climbs up in the pocket. Keeps his eyes downfield at all times.

Suffered a fishing accident in May of 2018. Got a fishing lure stuck in left leg and had to go to the hospital to have it removed. Suffered a fractured left (non throwing) hand in July of 2018 in another boating incident. Isn’t a great athlete. Strictly a pocket passer. Doesn’t have the speed or athleticism to pick up big yardage with his legs. Isn’t really a fluid mover, agile or have great mobility. Can’t get out of the way of oncoming pass rushers in a hurry. Doesn’t have a really big arm. Passes downfield tend to sail after about 50 yards. Throws mostly short and quick passes. Doesn’t throw many passes on the move. Will under throw his passes when flushed out of the pocket (vs. Tennessee 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 9 at the 13:48 mark). Passes outside of the pocket tend to be to the short level only.

He’s a QB thru and thru. He has "it". He has next level poise, decision making and accuracy. His accuracy is a special talent. Not many possess such a gift. He can take a sliver of an angle and make a perfect throw. He makes a lot of perfect throws. Above all else he is an unquestionable team leader. He’s the leader of men but he’s one of the younger ones in the room. He carves defenses up with quick and precise cuts. He uses his backs wisely as well as his TE’s and WR’s. He sprays the ball around really well. His ability to deliver a pass where it needs to be and on time is uncanny. He won’t wow at the Combine with his athletic testing or arm strength in comparison to some of the other QB’s with bigger arms but at a scripted Pro Day he will excel tremendously. His accuracy is his calling card and that will shine thru in that setting. He will be somewhat overlooked because he’s not the big arm player and doesn’t attack downfield consistently but he may very well exceed those QB’s drafted ahead of him when it’s all said and done. Late 1st-mid to late 2nd round.

Coaching/System: OC/QB Coach James Coley was named to his current position in January of 2019 after serving as Co-OC/QB Coach in 2018. He runs a ball control, pro style offense. He plans to open the playbook up more to take advantage of Jake Fromm’s abilities as a passer.

#84 Walter Grant (Jr.) OLB 6-4 245. Has appeared in 29 games with 8 starts. Versatile. An experienced OLB by trade but has experience at DE in a 4 man front, the Star/Nickel position but cross trained at RB and TE in the spring of 2019. Has a high football IQ. A very fast learner. Has great size for the position. Has an athletic frame. Has broad shoulders with long arms and legs. Has the frame to support 15-20 pounds of additional muscle mass if needed without sacrificing any athleticism. Good athlete. Has really good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.60-4.65 40 range). Has good fluidity and agility. Has good speed and quickness out of his stance as a DE. Looks very comfortable and natural in space. Has a smooth backpedal and comes out of it quickly. Has good tackling technique. Wraps up the ball carrier. Plays assignment sound. Always in the right position. Keeps contain as a run defender.

Doesn’t have much career production (30 tackles, 3.5 tackles for loss and.5 sacks). Isn’t a play maker. Doesn’t have a well defined role in the defense. Only plays to the OT’s outside shoulder at the LOS. Doesn’t rush the passer much. Lacks pass rush moves. Doesn’t try to speed past the OT. Never seems to put any kind of move on them. Only really rushes straight at them. Doesn’t disengage in time enough to make a play on the ball behind the line.

He’s a big multifaceted athlete who’s skill set is expansive. He can do any number of things and do them the way the coaches want it done. He’s a coaches dream type because he’s dependable but he isn’t a play maker. He doesn’t ever really make a play for himself. He never plays outside the box. He only makes sure he’s doing his job but when opportunity knocks and he gets a chance to make a tackle he often lets a teammate make it. His long term development may not be hurt by his being used on offense but it doesn’t help hi either. He’s still a question mark in many ways and he will remain so in the short term. There’s no reason for him to declare at all considering he doesn’t get a great deal of snaps. Doesn’t declare.

#10 Malik Herring (Jr.) DE 6-3 280. Has appeared in 29 games with 1 start. Has a very solid build with good weight distribution all throughout his frame. Has broad shoulders with long arms. Appears to be able to add about 10 pounds of muscle mass without sacrificing any athleticism. Good athlete. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.70-4.80 40 range). Really coordinated in all of his movements. Plays with good technique. Consistently keeps his pad level down. Really quick off of the snap. Very strong upper and lower body. Keeps OL off of his frame. Keeps them at arms length like he’s pushing a sled in a drill. A very stout run defender. Doesn’t get knocked back off of the ball. Can shed the OL in time to make a play on the ball. Uses a ripe move to discard them which tends to leave them off balance. Reacts well to the cut block. Stays low and uses his hands to keep OL from cutting off his legs. Plays assignment sound. Always keeps contain and gets his hands up in passing lanes. Has good ball awareness. Has a relentless nature as a pass rusher. Keeps hustling even when blocked (vs. Texas 2019, 1st quarter, 2nd & 2 at the :27 mark).

Doesn’t have much career production (30 tackles, 3.5 tackles for loss and 1.5 sacks). Has only played a grand total of 380 defensive snaps (119 in 2017 and 261 in 2018). Has an inconsistent get off at the snap. The last man to move at the snap at times. Isn’t much of a pass rusher. Doesn’t have any pass rush moves. Doesn’t attempt to go around the OL outside shoulder at all (vs. Texas 2019, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:53 mark). Always tries to engage them straight up. Also tries to go thru them or with a ripe move. This slows him down considerably.

He has really good athleticism for a bigger lineman. His athleticism leads itself to him being a scheme versatile player capable of playing DE in a 3-4 because he’s so strong and stout and has good quickness as a pass rusher, as a 5 technique in a 4-3 as well as a 3 technique there too. He has untapped pass rush capabilities that need to be developed because he has an ability to do it but isn’t equipped with any moves just yet. He’s used to engaging an OL being as though he’s more so a 3-4 DE. He showed total dominance against Georgia Tech playing against an OL and a system that is hard to practice against much less play against once a year and he showed the same against other teams, lastly Texas so he’s a well established run defender. With the more reps he gets in practice and with the more snaps he’ll get in games he should see that he can get past these OL without trying to go thru them. He’s a budding star and if he can find some pass rushing refinement he will be a top notch next level prospect moving forward. When the time comes he will be one of those prospects who gets great buzz post Combine because he performed so well in all of the drills and in the strength department. He has 1st round potentiality things round out properly but he does need time. If he doesn’t declare early he’s in the 3rd-5th round discussion. Doesn’t declare.

#9 Jeremiah Holloman (Jr.) WR 6-2 200. Has appeared in 19 games with 5 starts. Has excellent size for the position. Has a solid frame with long arms. Has a big catch radius. Versatile. Has experience at the X, Z and slot WR positions. Good athlete. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.50-4.55 40 range). Has a strong stutter step off of the line and into his routes against press coverage. Runs good routes. Gets to top speed at his release from the LOS. A natural hands catcher. Has excellent body control in the air (vs. Missouri 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 5 at the 7:11 mark). Has good jumping ability. Very sturdy after the catch. Isn’t an easy tackle. Keeps his balance after getting hit. Gives good effort as a blocker.

Doesn’t have much career production (25 catches for 425 yards and 5 TD’s). Has good but not great speed. Isn’t a breakaway threat as a receiver. Doesn’t have great short area movement skills. Can’t shake a defender in a phone booth. Will drop some passes that hit his hands. Hasn’t really run a diverse route tree. Runs shallow drag routes, go routes (which get cut to back shoulder fades) and slants. Isn’t a strong or forceful blocker. Doesn’t consistently show good blocking technique. Doesn’t break down and out his weight into his blocks. Doesn’t extend his arms consistently either. Doesn’t latch on at a high rate as a blocker in space. Takes bad angles to the defender.

He’s a good athlete with nice size for the X position. He’s strong and can beat press coverage at the line and has good speed to up the field. His long arms are a big plus and he uses them to his advantage at all times. His catch radius is impressive which is obvious on his back shoulder catches. He’s a nuisance to CB’s as a blocker with his long arms as well. He isn’t a great athlete though because he lacks a second gear and isn’t a very elusive receiver. He isn’t a dominant player when the ball is in the air either. He isn’t a guaranteed type on contested passes. He will drop some or not come down with catches that should be his. He isn’t as aggressive as he should be with a defender close. He may be the teams top receiver moving forward but he’s a number two receiver at best as a next level prospect. He should stay and exhaust his eligibility but he may have too good a season for that to occur. He will test will in a Combine and Pro Day setting as far as leaping ability and lower body explosiveness but not in the speed and agility drills. 4th-6th round.

#2 Richard LeCounte III (Jr.) FS 5-11 190. Has appeared in 24 games with 14 starts. An exceptionally good athlete! Has excellent speed (appears to run in the 4.45 to 4.50 40 range). Has great leaping ability. A quick twitch athlete. A very fluid mover. Very agile and mobile. Shows zero stiffness in his movements. Has a smooth backpedal and springs out of it. Shows good centerfielder ability and anticipation (vs. Alabama 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & Goal at the 11:02 mark). Has a nose for the near INT (3 vs. South Carolina 2018, (1) 1st quarter, 4th & 10 at the 4:00 mark, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the :30 mark and 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:18 mark as well as vs. Missouri 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:11 mark). Gets over the top of deep routes to help his CB. Recognizes run/pass quickly. Closes fast downhill as a run defender (vs. LSU 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 3:39 mark). Has excellent range (vs. Auburn 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 13 at the 9:01 mark). Takes good angles to the ball. Gives good effort as a tackler. Uses aggression when tackling.

Hasn’t always shown a great deal of discipline as a last line defender. Missed 15 tackles. Misses too many in the open field (vs. LSU 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 5:13 mark), (vs. Florida 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:22 mark), (vs. Alabama 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:05 mark), (vs. Texas 2029, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 6:22 mark) and (vs. Tennessee 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 12 at the 11:21 mark). Doesn’t break down in space. Will lunge at the ball carrier instead of wrapping up. A drag down tackler. Lacks the strength to stop ball carriers without giving up forward progress (vs. Missouri 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 7 at the 4:11 mark). Lowers his head at times. Lacks functional football strength. Doesn’t take on blocks well. Will get blocked out of plays. Doesn’t disengage in time enough to make a play on the ball. Isn’t s strong blitzer. Has to have a clear path to the QB in order to be effective.

He’s an incredible athlete who has great range for a deep safety. His instincts have improved to go along with his savvy. He’s a really good pass defender and almost always seems to take the proper angle to take away a passing lane. Gets to the right spots too as a run defender where he meets the ball carrier at the right spot. He’s not a big, strong or sturdy defender so making a tackle is at times a challenge for him. He can improve his tackling technique in the open field but he will need a great deal of work if he’s to ever become a sound and solid tackler. He’s weak in this area of his game and it has cost his team already. He has to become a more reliable last line defender or long gains by RB’s and mobile QB’s will be the norm. It will get him a seat on the bench if this aspect of his game doesn’t improve. He will test out on the amazing side in all of the defensive back drills at the Combine. He’s that natural a talent and his skill set lends itself to him being not only a FS but a fine NCB as well. He has positional versatility that hasn’t been used collegiately but could definitely be utilized on the next level. Mid 3rd-5th round.

#32 Monty Rice (Jr.) ILB 6-1 235. Has appeared in 23 games with 6 starts. Decent athlete. Has good fluidity and movement skills. A pretty stout run defender. Really good at avoiding the full flush of an OL block. Positions his body just right to not take on a big block. Doesn’t get stuck to blockers. Gets off of blocks in time to make a play on the ball. Has good instincts. Takes good angles to the ball. Good tackler. Always looks to wrap up with good form. Moves naturally in coverage. Does a good job of reading the QB’s eyes when dropping back in coverage (vs. South Carolina 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:36 mark).

Suffered a sprained MCL and missed the Missouri game on September 22, 2018. Suffered a left foot injury in pregame warmups before the UMass game on November 17, 2018. Missed the UMass, Georgia Tech, Alabama and Texas games as a result. Isn’t a great athlete. Isn’t particularly quick or fast (appears to run in the 4.75-4.85 40 range). Doesn’t have sideline to sideline speed. Lacks flexibility in space (vs. Florida 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:11 mark). Doesn’t get great depth in his drops in coverage. Isn’t a downhill thumper. Doesn’t close hard and fast on the ball. Makes most of his plays in and around the tackle box. Gets tricked on the RPO (vs. LSU 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:44 mark). Isn’t a good blitzer. Doesn’t avoid blocks moving downhill. Doesn’t extend his arms to keep OL off of his frame.

He sees and processes thing pretty quickly. He’s on the ball in a hurry when the play is in front of him. The majority of his production is made in his general area where he was lined up presnap or close to it. He gets great protection from his defensive line which enables him to move about freely. He simply doesn’t get blocked a lot. When he does he doesn’t shed the blocks and isn’t a factor. He struggles when forced to move outside of the tackle box and also when changing direction. He doesn’t have the speed to stop a RB or dual threat QB from taking the perimeter on him. He is a solid tackler but his tackling production isn’t necessarily a byproduct of how much promise he shows but more about how talented his DL is. He is more a two down LB who benefits from being in position to clean up with the amount of plays run or the quick passes in his general area. He lacks the speed and lower body explosiveness to ever really test well in a Combine type setting. He has two years of eligibility remaining so no matter how productive he may be his next level upside and potential will only be aided by him staying in school. Doesn’t declare.

#7 D’Andre Swift (Jr.) RB 5-9 215. Has appeared in 29 games with 6 starts. Has a powerful build. Has a big trunk with thick thighs. An excellent athlete! Has great speed, quickness and agility (appears to run in the 4.40-4.45 40 range). An in between the tackles runner. Naturally a one cut and burst upfield runner. Does have ankle breaking ability as well (vs. Florida 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 9:43 mark, vs. Kentucky 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 17 at the 2:35 mark and vs. Auburn 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 5:41 mark). Has great pad level and balance thru the hole. Runs with a forward lean. Always keeps his legs churning. Isn’t an easy tackle. Picks up extra yardage after contact. Powers thru arm tackles (vs. Florida 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 5 at the 4:38 mark and vs. Auburn 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 12 at the 14:08 mark). Really patient thru the hole (vs. Tennessee 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:57 mark and vs. Kentucky 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 8:10 mark). Will switch hands as a ball carrier to protect the ball from harm as he moves upfield (vs. LSU 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 8:20 mark). Has quick cut back ability when a hole is closed (vs. Tennessee 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 6 at the 3:42 mark). Can bounce a run to the perimeter with his pure speed (vs. Florida 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 3 at the 12:21 mark). Will secure the ball with both arms in close quarters. An excellent all purpose back. Has experience lined up in the slot in empty backfield sets. Can run sharp routes out of the backfield. Has excellent hands out of the backfield. A natural hands catcher. Will catch a pass and seamlessly take the ball upfield (vs. Tennessee 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:14 mark). Transitions from blocker to pass catcher easily. Can improvise as a route runner to help his QB as well (vs. LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 6 at the 1:11 mark). Identifies and picks up the blitz well. Throws a good cut block (vs. Auburn 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:37 mark). Has experience running the wild cat as well.

Had double hernia surgery after the 2017 season. Was limited in the spring of 2018 as a result. Played thru the same groin issue as well as an injured ankle during the 2018 season. Doesn’t have ideal height for the position. Will occasionally take his eyes off of the ball and drop a pass as a pass catcher (2 dropped passes in 2018). Had 2 fumbles where he didn’t brace/ready himself for the contact by protecting the ball (vs. Texas 2019, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:36 mark).

He’s the total package athletically. He has speed, power, vision, agility and excellent hands. Has plenty of tread left on his tires as well. He’s only had 613 total snaps in his collegiate career (215 in 2017 and 398 in 2018). He has less than 300 total touches (244 carries and 49 catches). Although he’s suffered some injuries he isn’t a used and abused RB exiting college as a next level prospect. His game is very much refined at such a young age as well. He has no apparent negatives outside of his injuries or and occasional miscue as far as a drop or fumble but even those aren’t commonplace. The talent is there in spades and if he can maintain good health he’s a sure fire early round pick. He’d be best used in a back by committee approach but he’s big and strong enough to carry the bulk of the load. He doesn’t need a Combine or Pro Day to prove his worth but if he does go he’d only be reinforcing who and what he is with a guaranteed great showing. 1st round.

#71 Andrew Thomas (Jr.) LT/RT 6-5 320. Has appeared in 28 games with 28 starts (15 at RT and 13 at LT). Versatile. Has starting experience at both LT and RT. Has played a total of 1,571 snaps in two years (914 snaps in 2017 and 657 in 2018). Has great size for the position. Has broad shoulders with long arms and great weight distribution all throughout his frame. An excellent athlete. A dancing bear. Very light on his feet. Has excellent foot speed for the LT position. Has a quick kick slide. Very coordinated in all of his movements. A natural knee bender. Quick off of the snap as a run blocker. Drives defenders off of the ball with force when he has good hand placement. Can steer and control them 5 yards downfield. A tremendous down blocker. Gets great push on the DE. Consistently buries them. Reaches the second with ease. Converts speed to power on the second level (vs. South Carolina 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:58 mark).

Suffered a sprained left ankle in the third quarter against South Carolina on September 8, 2018. Missed the remainder of the game as well as the following game against Middle Tennessee State on September 15, 2018 as a result. Was injured in the first quarter against Florida on October 27, 2018 when a defender rolled up on the back of his right leg. Returned to the game in the 4th quarter. Isn’t always stout as a pass blocker. Doesn’t always absorb the shock of initial contact well. Gets knocked back into the pocket on contact a lot. Gives ground on the defenders hand punch. Doesn’t show a consistently strong hand punch. Defenders tend to slide out of his clutches. Shows some inconsistencies in his kick slide. Doesn’t get enough depth in his kick slide at times. Will stop his feet in anticipation of contact at times. Turns into a lunger and waist bender in such instances when he allows a defender to gain the edge. Isn’t always on high alert for a stunting DL or late blitzer. Gets flat footed at times (vs. LSU 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 12:09 mark). Gets ripped by defenders and thrown off balance. Shows clumsiness at times when defenders give him unexpected pass rush variation (vs. LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 9:55 mark and vs. LSU 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 6:05 mark).

He’s a good athlete for such a big prospect and his versatility is a huge bonus in his next level equation. He has impressive speed and quickness off of the snap and into driving defenders way off of the LOS as a run blocker. Aggression is his game at this point. He’s much further along as a run blocker than he is as a pass blocker. In the running game he can be outright dominant but as a pass blocker he has some technical issues to clean up. He does get sloppy with his hands and feet especially when he faces something unexpected on a snap. He lunges and his feet get a bit sloppy when he feels he’s been beaten to a spot. He has the recovery capabilities but goes against proper technique to try to do things. He seems a bit too light on his feet at times as well. His pad level rises some in pass protection and he gets pushed back into the pocket consistently. He has to learn to stay low and use his arms, hands and feet in unison. His athletic upside is very high so he should be able to correct his technique flaws and their are next level coaches that would be happy to get the chance to work with him to correct them if he doesn’t at the collegiate level. His biggest test is he has faced talented DL and LB’s but no one who has tested him with great speed and quickness off of the snap. That would be an ideal challenge for his development as well. Top 20 pick.

#79 Isaiah Wilson (rSo.) RT 6-7 340. Has appeared in 14 games with 14 starts. Played 858 of the teams 923 total offensive snaps in 2018. The epitome of a physically imposing player!!! A mountain of a human being. Has great size for the position. Very tall with long arms and legs with great weight distribution throughout his frame. Doesn’t carry any bad weight. Has a very muscular frame from top to bottom. Still appears lean. Good athlete. Very natural in all of his movements. A fluid mover. A natural knee bender. Quick off of the snap. Smooth in his transition from his initial block then to a blitzer (vs. South Carolina 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 14:06 mark). Has good technique and footwork when given time to proper set and kick slide.

Isn’t refined in his technique. Doesn’t always display good balance (vs. Auburn 2018, 1st & 10 at the 8:42 mark). Tends to whiff and lunge when he doesn’t latch on to a moving defender (vs. Kentucky 2018, 3rd & 5 at the 7:10 mark). Will abandon his footwork when faced with a speed rusher at times (vs. South Carolina 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 1:21 mark and vs LSU 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 12:28 mark). Will make a misstep at times leading to poor pad level (vs. Missouri 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:39 mark). Isn’t a mauler. Doesn’t get great push as a run blocker. Doesn’t move defenders off of the ball on a consistent basis. Doesn’t make a strong upfield surge as a run blocker. Lacks a strong hand punch. Hands don’t jostle a defender or throw them off course. Defenders tend to slide out of his clutches. Doesn’t sustain blocks when he does make it to the second level.

He’s a really good natural athlete and it’s a bit of a surprise considering how big of an athlete he is. He doesn’t have the awkwardness that most bigger OL have to overcome in order to realize their potential. He’s an actual coordinated player but his size does have its negatives as well. His stature won’t allow him to get lower than the lowest. He has to always make the concerted effort to stay low and develop that tendency. He doesn’t get great push or drive especially at the goal line. It’s a lot to ask for such a player to have great balance and coordination when he has so many extreme moving parts. He needs at least two more years of honing his technique and getting his own physical movements down in order to become a realistically viable next level prospect. He has the talent, athleticism and skill set to make it for sure but he does need a great deal of work to be very good once he gets there. He could be stellar once he develops good technique and good habits from down to down but it will take him time. If he leaves prematurely he risks the chance at being just pedestrian and a journeyman type as opposed to staying until he’s ready and being something special. Doesn’t declare.

Non draft eligible player(s) of note:

#99 Jordan Davis (So.) NT 6-6 320. Has appeared in 11 games with 4 starts. An unsung player. Takes up a lot of space. Garners a lot of attention from interior OL. Clogs ups running lanes and allows his LB’s to make plays untouched. Pushes the pocket back some as well in the passing game. Has to keep his weight under control to maximize his tremendous potential.

#77 Cade Mays (So.) OL 6-6 315. Has appeared in 11 games with 8 starts (7 at RG and 1 at LT). Versatile. Has the ability to play anywhere on the OL. Extremely strong. Plays with power and good technique. Gets great push as a run blocker and can stonewall defenders as a pass blocker. Is in the running to overtake an upperclassman for the RG position.

FanPosts are generated by Dawg Sports readers and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Dawg Sports staff or SB Nation.